Rewriting Sentence Fragments

PRACTICE 2: Rewriting Sentence Fragments

(A) Label each sentence Frag. (sentence fragment) or Comp. (complete sentence). Then on a separate sheet of paper, rewrite each fragment to make a complete sentence.

Frag  1. The desire of all humankind to live in peace and freedom, for example.

Rewrite: The desire of all humankind to live in peace and freedom; for example, many humanitarian organizations work for stopping the war in the world.

Frag  2. Second, a fact that men are physically stronger than women.

Rewrite: Second, a fact that man is physically stronger than women; therefore, men intend to dominate women.

Comp 3. The best movie I saw last year.

Comp 4. Titanic was the most financially successful movie ever made, worldwide.

Frag 5. For example, many students have part-time jobs.

Rewrite: Students cannot join every class in the university; for example, many students have part-time jobs.

Frag 6. Although people want to believe that all men are created equal.

Rewrite:  Although people want to believe that all men are created equal, people are not the same in

Comp 7. Finding a suitable marriage partner is a challenging task.

Frag 8. Many of my friends who did not have the opportunity to go to college.

Rewrite:  Many of my friends who did not have the opportunity to go to college; I will invite them to join Open University to study again.

Frag 9.  A tsunami that occurred in the Indian Ocean in December 2004, killing more than 200,000 people.

Rewrite:  A tsunami occurred in the Indian Ocean in December 2004, killing more than 200,000 people considered the most devastating tsunami in Asia.

Comp 15. Despite a lag of up to several hours between the earthquake and the tsunami, nearly all of the victims were taken completely by surprise.

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Fill in the blanks with appropriate forms of the verb given in the brackets

EXERCISE 1: Fill in the blanks with appropriate forms of the verb given in the brackets.

It is customary for Malaysians to work at least eight hours per day if they (1) work in an office. However, this is considered as long working hours in Europe. Working long hours (2) is common for most Asian countries, such as Singapore, Hong Kong, and South Korea – all countries with developing economies. Malaysia (3) has been ranked as one of the top countries with workaholic employees as they also work on holidays. (4) Does this reputation harm or benefit Malaysia? Japan and South Korea (5) have taken the initiative to reduce the number of working hours as they fear longer working hours may cause health problems and (6) reduce the quality of life for the workers. Nevertheless, if Malaysia reduces its working hours, productivity will suffer. The Malaysian economy largely (7) depends on a productive workforce. If working hours are decreased, workers may not be able to make up for lost hours or meet employer demands. It is also feared that employers will put more expectation on workers to complete their tasks in a fairly short deadline. Moreover, if employees (8) take long leave, it may reflect negatively on their careers. As one travel survey found, Malaysian employees take the least amount of leave for travel. The survey mentioned that this trend (9) is worrisome as taking annual leave for travelling is important for workers’ well-being. Malaysian employees are reluctant to take long work holidays because they have the option of carrying forward the unused leave to the next year calendar. Therefore, instead of reducing working hours for Malaysian workers, a more viable solution for their productivity and the economy of the country (10) is to allocate more hours for the lunch break, currently practiced by workers in Spain. The workers in Spain take a ‘siesta’, or a long break in the afternoon for resting and doing leisure activities after lunch, and they resume working at about 4 pm. Thus, reducing working hours may be counterproductive for the Malaysian economy in the long run.

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Subject-Verb Agreement errors: Identify and correct the errors

EXERCISE 2

The text below contains SIX Subject-Verb Agreement errors. Identify and correct the errors.

Many people have diverse thoughts about the importance of early childhood learning. Better academic achievement, of course, is one of them. According to Ethridge (2010), the president of the National Association of Early Childhood Teacher Educators, children who attend early learning programmes demonstrate higher levels of school achievement and better social adjustment than those who have no formal early education. These children are less likely to repeat a grade or be placed in special education classes, since learning issues can be identified and mediated early. In addition to that, research also indicate that children who have had formal early learning experiences are also more likely to graduate from high school with better grades as they learn best when educational activities ias exposed at the very early age. Thus, it will help them perform better in examinations.

On the other hand, critics of pre-kindergarten education highlight the differences between children enrolled in pre-school programmes and children not receiving formal education. Most childhood education specialists claim that it is not good for young children to be separated from their parents for extended periods of time. One reason for this is children who are educated by their parents during their early developmental years experience the same benefits as children enrolled in pre-school programmes, especially children receiving a lot of attention from parents. While some children benefit immensely from pre-school, it may not be the best educational setting for other children. In fact, they usually do not benefit in programmes with inexperienced teachers and large classroom sizes. Parents must evaluate a child’s unique personality before determining which programme is best suited for a child since not all programmes benefit children the same way.

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