3 Types of Communication Models- Linear, Interactive & Transactional Model

3 types of models of communication. The 3 types of communication models are Linear Models of Communication,  Interactive Models of Communication, and also Transactional Models of Communication.

Model of Communication Process

The communication model refers to the conceptual framework or theory that explains the way of human communication. It also represents the entire process of communication between the sender and the receiver. The communication model tries to answer the 5WH questions; for example, what is it actually? who is involved in this process? when does it happen? where does it take place? and finally, why does it occur?  Additionally, communication models explain the element of the basic communication process including context. sender, receiver, encoding, decoding, channel, message, feedback, also noise.  The model of communication also explains the factors that bar effective communication. Communication barriers or communication noises bar effective communication processes.

3 Types of communication models

The 3 Types of the communication process model are

  1. Linear Models of Communication
  2. Interactive Models of Communication
  3. Transactional Models of Communication

The 3 types of communication models are the Linear Models of Communication, the Interactive Models of Communication, and the Transactional Models of Communication. A-List of the best communication models and establish year has been outlined below for obtaining more knowledge as well as better understanding. The types of communication models have also attached to the communication model’s table.

1. Linear Model of Communication
Communication Models Year Types  of Communication Models
For example, Aristotle’s Model of Communication 300BC Linear Model of Communication
Shannon-Weaver Model of Communication 1948 Linear Model of Communication
Lasswell’s Model of Communication 1948 Linear Model of Communication
Berlo’s SMCR Model of Communication 1960 Linear Model of Communication
Also, Two-Step Flow of Communication Theory 1948 Linear Model of Communication
2. Interactive Model of Communication
For example, Osgood-Schramm Model of Communication 1954 Interactive Model of Communication
Also, Westley and Maclean Model of Communication 1957 Interactive Model of Communication
3. Transactional Model of Communication
For example, Osgood-Schramm Model of Communication 1954 Interactive Model of Communication
Also, Westley and Maclean Model of Communication 1957 Interactive Model of Communication
The Most Effective Model of Communication

The author is going to outline as well as discuss the most effective model of communication in the field of communication.

Aristotle’s Model of Communication

In 300 BC, Aristotle developed a linear model of communication that mainly focus on the speaker and messages. Controversially, it is the first model of communication. Aristotle’s model of communication consists of five elements of the basic communication process for example Speaker, Speech, Occasion, Audience, and Effect. Aristotle’s model of communication focuses on the speaker. The speaker plays the most important role in communication because the speaker sets the message to deliver. The speech is the message of the speaker that might vary on the occasion.

Models of communication- Aristotle's model of communication
Figure 1: Aristotle’s Model of Communication

For example, a political leader (speaker/sender) is delivering a speech to persuade the voter to vote for him in the election. The political leader is the most important person here who is delivering the message or information. The speech is the message that the leader delivers to influence the voters to vote for him. The election is the occasion and the speech or message of the speaker is set based on the occasion. A political leader might not deliver the same kind of speech before and after the election. Finally, the effect refers to the level of motivation of the voters whether they are motivated to cast vote for him or not.

Lasswell’s Model of Communication

Lasswell’s model of communication was introduced by professor Harold Lasswell in 1948. It is a Linear Model of Communication that also represents the style of one-way communication or interaction. Lasswell’s explains the process of communication by answering the following questions;

  • Who?
  • Says What?
  • In Which Channel?
  • To Whom?
  • With What Effect?
Models of Communication- Lasswel's model of linear communication model
Figure 2: Lasswell’s Model of Communication

Example of Lasswell’s Model of Communication

For example, the BBC News channel has telecasted news regarding the negative impact of social media in spreading fake and misleading information. It also shows how social media can affect people physically and mentally. Finally, they recommend some tips on how to stop spreading fake and disinformation via social media. Based on the set of questions outlined by Lasswell’s model of communication and the example, firstly, the answer to the question “Who” is the news presenter of BBC News Channel. Secondly, Says What indicates that people use social media to spread fake and misleading information. Thirdly, the answer to the question of “In which Channel” indicates the BBC News Channel. Additionally, “To Whom” refers to the people who are watching this channel. Finally, With what effect indicates the awareness.

Shannon–Weaver Model of Communication

Shannon-Weaver model of communication was established by two American scholars Shannon and Weaver in 1948. Shannon-Weaver model is called the mother of all communication models; although, it is a linear type of communication model.  At first, this model was designed to articulate the process of technical communication. Later, it discusses the process of effective communication. Shannon-Weaver model represents the basic six elements of communication including information source, transmitter, channel, receiver, destination, and noise source. This model does not represent feedback therefore it is a linear model of communication. Later, this model was been criticized by many other scholars for not having feedback. Feedback is a vital element to create the communication process more interactive and effective. However, Norbert Weiner added the Feedback element to the model.

What is the established date of the Shannon-Weaver model?

The Shannon-Weaver model was introduced in 1948. Although there is conversely regarding the establishment year of the Shannon-Weaver model, in 1948, it was introduced by Claude Shannon through his article name Mathematical Theory of Communication. In 1949, Warren Weaver reprints the previous article adding more information. So, it is safe to say that the Shannon-Weaver model was introduced in 1948.

5 Gaps Model of Service Quality- Servqual Gaps Model or 5 Gaps Model

5 Gaps Model of Service Quality- Servqual Gaps Model or 5 Gaps Model. The 5 Gaps of Service Quality are 1. Knowledge Gap, 2. Policy Gap, 3. Communication Gap, 4. Delivery Gap, and 5. Customer Gap. Examples of the 5 Gaps of service quality.

5 Gaps Model of Service Quality

What is the 5 Gaps Model of Service Quality or Servqual gaps model?

5 Gaps Model of Service Quality means Servqual gaps model that describes the customer experiences and service quality provided by the organization. It articulates the gap between customers’ expectations and the service provided to them in different stages of the service providing process.  The service quality will be high when the customers’ perception meets the expectation but the quality is low when the customer’s perception cannot meet the expectation. The Servqual model is also known as the 5 gap model that represents a customer-satisfaction framework.

5 Gaps Model of Service Quality or Servqual gaps model. The 5 Gaps of Service Quality are 1. Knowledge Gap, 2. Policy Gap, 3. Communication Gap, 4. Delivery Gap, and 5. Customer Gap.
Figure 1: 5 Gaps Model of Service Quality or Servqual Gaps Model
5 Gaps of Service Quality
  1. Knowledge Gap
  2. Policy Gap
  3. Communication Gap
  4. Delivery Gap
  5. Customer Gap
Gap 1: Knowledge Gap

The knowledge gap refers to the difference between the company’s perception of what the customer expects from the industry and the exact expectation of the customers. This gap can grow if management doesn’t focus on the customer’s expectations thoroughly.

There are many reasons that can increase the knowledge gap, for example:

  • Not focusing on what customers expect.
  • Lack of upward communication.
  • Insufficient market analysis.
  • Less focus on relationships.
  • Failure to understand customer complaints.
  • Lack of interaction between management and customer.
Example of the Knowledge Gap

The user of Netflix wants to see the upcoming movie trailers on the website. So, Netflix would suffer this gap if it did not provide the upcoming movie list.

Gap 2: Policy Gap

The policy gap is the difference between management perceptions of the customer needs and the translation of those perceptions into service delivery policies and standards. This gap occurs because of the dissimilarity of what the customer wants and what the management provides for the customers.

There are many reasons that can grow the policy gap, for instance:

  • First of all, Insufficient commitment to service quality
  • Additionally, Lack of task standardization
  • Moreover, Lack of goal setting
  • Further, Shortness of customer service standards.
  • Also, Inadequately described service levels.
  • Finally, Failure to continually update service level standards.
Example of the Policy Gap

Netflix will suffer from the policy gap if it uploads the upcoming movie trailers after releasing the movie. People want to watch the movie trailer before releasing the movie.

Gap 3: Delivery Gap

The delivery gap is the dissimilarity between the standard of the service delivery policies of the company and the actual delivery of the service. This problem may occur because of the communication gap, poor technology, and inappropriate supervisory on productions in the industry.

This gap occurs because of many reasons in the industry, for example;

  • Firstly, Lack of teamwork to deliver service or product
  • Secondly, the lack of knowledge of the employee about the product or service
  • Thirdly, Insufficient human resources.
  • In addition, the Service performance gap.
  • Further, the Role ambiguity and role conflict – unsure of what your remit is and how it fits with others.
  • Moreover, the Poor employee or technology fit – the wrong person or system for the job.
  • Also, the Inappropriate supervisory control or lack of perceived control – too much or too little control.
Example of Delivery Gap

Netflix may experience this gap if it uploads the lower video quality movie.

Gap 4: Communication Gap

The communication gap refers to is the gap between what the company advertises about the products and what exactly the customer gets delivered. It occurs when the company cannot provide services or products according to the commitment.  It is a very important dimension because it may lead to customer disappointment.

This communication gap occurs because of many reasons in the industry including;

  • Over-commitment.
  • Lack of integration between communication and production department.
  • Inadequate communications between the advertising teams and the operations department.
Example of Communication Gap

Netflix may suffer this gap if it is unable to telecast the HD video that promised to offer.

Gap 5: Customer Gap

The customer gap is the difference between customer perceptions of the experience and customer expectations of the service.  Many organizations are not conscious of this gap; therefore, they are losing a big number of customers overnight.

In conclusion, the 5 Gaps Model of Service Quality is also known as the Gap model that intended to analyze gaps and problems between organizations and customers. Finally, the customer gratification will come out through the model that is a very important factor for continual improvement as well as the business.