Social Media For Researchers- Top Social Media Sites For Researchers

Social Media For Researchers, Top Social Media Sites For Researchers and Scientists are Researchgate, Academia, Google Scholar, ORCID, Scopus, Linkedin. Researchers and Scholars Social Media Platforms. Also, Academic social media platforms. 

Social Media for Researchers

Researcher’s social media refer to the social networking platforms for academic people, scholars and scientists to share their experiences, publications, and works. Researchers use these social networking sites to be connected with other researchers across the world. There are more than 500 social networking sites or social media platforms all over the world. In 2021, the most famous social media is Facebook, following Youtube, Twitter, Linkedin, Researchgate, Academia, and so more. However, researchers prefer to use those kinds of social media platforms where they can share their publications and research works. They also like to be connected with other scholars via these platforms. For example, a communication student can follow a researcher of the communication department who has many publications. So, new researchers can follow the veteran researchers, and they can learn from experts.

The top social media sites for researchers are:

  1. ResearchGate
  2. Academia
  3. Google Scholar
  4. ORCID
  5. Scopus
  6. Microsoft Academic
  7. Linkedin
  8. Twitter
  9. Reddit
  10. Tumblr
Social Media For Researchers and Scholars- Top Social Media Sites For Researchers and professional networking site for academic person
Social Media Sites For Researchers and Scientists
1. ResearchGate- Social Media For Researcher

ResearchGate is the most famous professional networking site for researchers, scientists and students who prefer to share their publications with others. It a great platform to find collaboration and connect colleagues. This social networking site is a join-free platform where users can ask questions to get answers related to research. It is estimated that more than 20+ million researchers are using ResearchGate, and around 130+ million papers have been shared on this social media site. ResearchGate is a European site that started its journey as a commercial social networking platform.

The mission of Researchgate is to connect the world of science and make research open to all.

The speciality of the ResearchGate

Firstly, Researchgate is a very familiar social media site for scholars and the Alexa ranking is approximately 160 that less than 200. So, it is the most popular social media platform for researchers after Google scholar. 

Additionally, ResearchGate is an open-access social media site where anyone can read the paper without registration.

Also, ResearchGate has become a very famous platform to ask questions. Anyone can ask any questions here, but new researchers ask a question regarding the publication and research.

Further, ResearchGate provides stats and scores for researchers based on the activities. The score gets improve when the researcher performs well in four sections, such as publications, questions, answers, and followers. The score gets high when researchers ask more questions and answer more questions. Apart from that, it will progress when they share more publications to this social media site and the number of followers increases.

ResearchGate Contact
  • Help Centre
  • ResearchGate GmbH, Administrators: Dr. Ijad Madisch, Dr. Sören Hofmayer
  • Register: HR Hannover B 202837, VAT-ID: DE258434568, Tel: +49 (0) 30 2000-51001.
Academia- Social Media For Researchers

Academia is a social media platform for sharing research papers. It has uploaded around 22 million academic papers. The number of total registered user is 153,000,000+. Every month, 31 million researchers, academics, students, and professionals access this site to read papers.

Richard Price is the founder of Academia who has completed his PhD at Oxford in philosophy. The mission of Academia.edu is to accelerate the world’s academic research.
The speciality of Academia.edu
Firstly, it is totally free to upload download paper on Academia. The user needs to have an account here to access this service.  However, anyone can read the paper without having any account here.
Google Scholar
Google Scholar refers to the academic article publishing platform where researchers share peer-reviewed online academic journals and books, conference papers, theses and dissertations, preprints, abstracts, technical reports, and other scholarly literature, including court opinions and patents.

Group Communication Barriers: 4 Types of Barriers in Group or Team Communication

Group communication barriers- 4 Types of Barriers in Group or Team Communication: Ethnocentrism, Stereotyping, Prejudice, and Discrimination. 

Group Communication Barriers

What are Barriers to Group Communication?

Group communication barriers are disturbances that obstacles to interactive communication among group members. The barrier in group communication hiders to understand other members in the group or team. The four types of barriers in group communication are Ethnocentrism, Stereotyping, Prejudice, and Discrimination. 

Four Types Barriers in Group or Team Communication
  1. Ethnocentrism
  2. Stereotyping
  3. Prejudice
  4. Discrimination.
1. Ethnocentrism

Ethnocentrism is a barrier in group communication that obstacle to effective communication among the group or team members.  Actually, ethnocentrism is a mistaken belief that your culture is superior to others, with special rights and privileges that are or should be denied to others. It is not about patriotism or pride.

For example-

  • Firstly, my culture should be a role model for other cultures.
  • In addition, people would be happier if they lived like people in my culture.
  • Furthermore, most other cultures are backward when compared with my culture.
  • For example, Have you ever been insulted by someone who implies that his/her religious beliefs are “true”, whereas yours are not?
  • For instance, Have you been disrespected by someone who believes that his traditions, language, or music preferences are “better” than yours?
2. Stereotyping
3. Prejudice
  • Stereotyping ⇒ Prejudice
  • “Negative attitudes about other people that are based on faulty and inflexible stereotypes.”
  • Most prejudices are negative.
  • For example, “He cannot be brilliant if he only has a Bachelor’s degree from XX University or College. In addition, “I don’t want a person with disabilities working on our group project.”
  • Characteristics:
    • Firstly, they are rarely based on extensive direct experience and first-hand knowledge.
    • Secondly, the result is irrational feelings or dislike and even hatred for certain groups.
    • Finally, they justify a readiness to behave in negative and unjust ways toward members of the group.
4. Discrimination
  • Discrimination describes how we act-out and express prejudice
  • When we discriminate, we exclude groups of people from opportunities granted to others: employment, promotion, housing, political expression, and equal rights.
  • For example, Racial, ethnic, religious, gender, sexual harassment, sexual orientation, disability, age people from different social classes and political ideologies