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Study in Malaysia: Best University For Bachelor, Master & PhD Degree in Malaysia

Study in Malaysia: Best University For Bachelor, Master & Ph.D. Degree. This content will help those students who want to study in Malaysia. Students should choose the perfect university before getting admission because a good university can build a student’s better career. Today we are providing some authentic information regarding public and private universities in Malaysia. In addition, we will let you know how to apply for getting admission to a public university. Every student needs to know this basic information before deciding to study in Malaysia. We recommend students to study at top-ranked Public universities and private in Malaysia.

Malaysia is one of the best Asian countries for multi-culture and diversity. It is the best country for natural calamities and a friendly environment. Many students from all over the world are coming to study in Malaysia now. There are many world-ranked universities located in Malaysia such as  University Malaya(UM), University Putra Malaysia (UPM), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), and so on.

How To Get Admission at University Putra Malaysia (UPM) in Malaysia. Study in Malaysia: Best University For Bachelor, Master & PhD Degree

Table of Contents:

  1. List of Public and Private universities in Malaysia with QS Rank.
  2. How to apply for getting admission in University Putra Malaysia
  3. The Global Assistant Consulting Firm

1. List of Public and Private universities in Malaysia with Rank.

According to the list published in 2018, there are 20 public universities and 47 private universities in Malaysia. There are 34 university colleges and 10 foreign university campuses.

List of Top 20 Public Universities in Malaysia:

No.Name of universityDate establishedLocation
1Universiti Malaya (UM)1-1-1962Kuala Lumpur
2Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM)1971Selangor
3Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM)18-5-1970Selangor
4Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM)1969Penang
5Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM)1-4-1975Johor
6Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM)26-8-1999Selangor
7Universiti Islam Antarabangsa Malaysia (UIAM)10-5-1983Selangor
8Universiti Utara Malaysia (UUM)16-2-1984Kedah
9Universiti Malaysia Sarawak (UNIMAS)24-12-1992Sarawak
10Universiti Malaysia Sabah (UMS)24-11-1994Sabah
11Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris (UPSI)24-2-1997Perak
12Universiti Sains Islam Malaysia (USIM)13-3-1998Negeri Sembilan
13Universiti Malaysia Terengganu (UMT)15-7-1999Terengganu
14Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (UTHM)30-9-2000Johor
15Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka (UTeM)1-12-2000Melaka
16Universiti Malaysia Pahang (UMP)16-2-2002Pahang
17Universiti Malaysia Perlis (UniMAP)2-5-2002Perlis
18Sultan Zainal Abidin (UniSZA)1-1-2006Terengganu
19Universiti Malaysia Kelantan (UMK)14-6-2006Kelantan
20Universiti Pertahanan Nasional Malaysia, (UPNM)10-11-2006Kuala Lumpur

List of Top 47 Private Universities in Malaysia:

No.Name of universityDate establishedLocation
1Multimedia University (MMU), Cyberjayaestablished in 1997Cyberjaya / Melaka / Johor
2Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN)established in 1999Putrajaya / Pahang
3Universiti Tun Abdul Razak (UniRAZAK)established in 1999Selangor
4Universiti Teknologi Petronas (UTP)established in 1999Selangor
5International Medical University (IMU)established in 1999Kuala Lumpur
6Universiti Selangor (UNISEL)established in 2000Selangor
(Shah Alam and Bestari Jaya)
7Open University Malaysia (OUM)established in 2000Kuala Lumpur
8Malaysia University of Science & Technology (MUST)established in 2000Selangor
9AIMST Universityestablished in 2001Kedah
10Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman (UTAR)established in 2002Selangor / Perak
11Universiti Kuala Lumpur (UniKL)established in 200111 campuses located in Kuala Lumpur and around the country
12Wawasan Open Universityestablished in 2006Penang
13Albukhary International Universityestablished in 2006Kedah
14Al-Madinah International University (MEDIU)established in 2006Selangor
15International Centre for Education in Islamic Finance (INCEIF)established in 2006Kuala Lumpur
16Limkokwing University of Creative Technologyupgraded to university college in 2003, and further upgraded to full university status in 2007Putrajaya
17Management and Science University (MSU)formerly KUTPM which was established in 2001 and upgraded to full university in 2007Selangor
18Asia e University (AeU)established in 2007Kuala Lumpur
19UCSI Universityupgraded to university college in 2003 and further upgraded to full university status in 2008Kuala Lumpur / Terengganu Sarawak
20Quest International University Perakestablished in 2009Perak
21INTI International University (IIU)upgraded to university college in 2006 and further upgraded to full university status in 2010Negeri Sembilan
22Taylor’s Universityupgraded to university college in 2006 and further upgraded to full university status in 2010Selangor
23Sunway Universityupgraded to university college in 2004 and further upgraded to full university status in 2011Selangor
24Manipal International Universityestablished in 2010Nilai
25Perdana Universityestablished in 2011Selangor
26HELP Universityupgraded to university college in 2004 and further upgraded to full university status in 2011Kuala Lumpur
27UNITAR International Universityestablished in 2011Selangor
28Raffles University Iskandar (RUI)established in 2011Johor
29Malaysia Institute of Supply Chain Innovation (MISI)established in 2011Selangor
30Nilai Universityupgraded in 2007 and further upgraded to full university status in 2012Negeri Sembilan
31SEGi Universityupgraded in 2008 and further upgraded to full university status in 2012Selangor
32Asia Pacific University of Technology and Innovation (APU)upgraded in 2004 and further upgraded to full university status in 2012Kuala Lumpur
33Binary University of Management and Entrepreneurshipupgraded in 2004 and further upgraded to full university status in 2012Selangor
34Infrastructure University Kuala Lumpur (IUKL)upgraded in 2003 and further upgraded to full university status in 2012Selangor
35Asia Metropolitan Universityupgraded in 2008 and further upgraded to full university status in 2012Selangor/Johor
(Two campuses: Cheras campus, Selangor and Johor)
36Putra Business Schoolestablished in 2012Selangor
37Global NXT Universityestablished in 2012Kuala Lumpur
38MAHSA Universityupgraded in 2009 and further upgraded to full university status in 2013Selangor
39International University of Malaya-Walesestablished in 2013Kuala Lumpur
40University Malaysia of Computer Science and Engineeringestablished in 2013Putrajaya
41Universiti Islam Malaysia, Cyberjayaestablished in 2014Selangor
42DRB-HICOM University of Automotive Malaysiaestablished in 2015Pahang
43Asia School of Businessestablished in 2015Kuala Lumpur
44City Universityupgraded in 2010 and further upgraded to full university status in 2016Selangor
45Meritus Universityestablished in 2016Kuala Lumpur
46Universiti Sultan Azlan Shanupgraded in 2012 and further upgraded to full university status in 2016Perak
47Universiti Islam Antarabangsa Sultan Abdul Halim Mu’adzam Shahupgraded in 2006 and further upgraded to full university status in 2018Kedah

2. How to apply for getting admission in University Putra Malaysia

University Putra Malaysia is the public university and is located in Selangor. University Putra Malaysia is the best young university in Malaysia.UPM is the abbreviation of the University Putra Malaysia. According to QS ranking 2019-2020, UPM ranked 159 in the world.

Do you want to study at University Putra Malaysia for Foundation, Bachelor’s, Master & Ph.D. Degree?

We are providing three important links to apply for admission at University Putra Malaysia.

For a Foundation Degree:

https://akademik.upm.edu.my/kemasukan_antarabangsa/admission_foundation-3897

Bachelor Degree:

https://smp.upm.edu.my/smp/action/applicant/international/register

Master’s and Ph.D. Degree:

https://itma.upm.edu.my/post_graduate/apply_now/online_system_for_postgraduate_application_for_admission-2250

3. The Global Assistant Consulting Firm

The Global Assistant is one of the renowned consulting firm recognized and affiliated by University Putra Malaysia. Global Assistant Consulting firm has legitimate power to get students admitted to University Putra Malaysia.

Contact information of the Global Assistant Consulting Firm:

E-mail: globalassistant.cf@gmail.com

What’s app: +60176852551

Official Website: https://theglobalassistant.blogspot.com/

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Cultural Dimensions: Hofstede’s Cultural Dimensions Theory With Six Dimensions

Cultural Dimensions: Hofstede’s cultural dimensions theory is a framework for cross-cultural communication. It was developed in 1980 by Dutch management researcher Geert Hofstede. Hofstede’s cultural dimensions theory shows the effects of a society’s culture on the values of its members. It also shows how these values relate to behavior, using a structure derived from factor analysis. Culture is a pattern of values, beliefs, attitudes, behaviors,  symbols, and norms, shared by a group of people.

Six categories of cultural dimensions are:

  1. Individualism – collectivism
  2. Power distance
  3. Uncertainty avoidance
  4. Masculine – feminine values
  5. High context – lower context
  6. Monochronic time – Polychronic time
1. Individualistic/ Collectivism: Prefer to act independently or interdependently.
  • Individualism: Individualistic members will work alone and seek credit for their own work. Value individual achievement and freedom. US, Australia, Canada.
  • Collectivism: Collectivist members will work in groups and try to help each other. Collectivist members may prefer face-to-face discussions instead of virtual discussions. Emphasize group identity. Asian and Latin American countries.

Recommended Adaptations: Encourage collectivism. Make sure that individualistic members understand that they are part of a larger group that needs their input and participation to achieve a shared goal.

2. Power distance: Extent of equity or status among members.
  • High power: Inequity between high- and low-status members. Mexico, India, Singapore.
  • Low power: Equity and interdependence among group members. New Zealand, Denmark.

Recommended Adaptations: Establish clear norms for member behavior. To what extent will members participate in decision-making? How will specific tasks be assigned? How and by whom will members be evaluated? Who will serve as leader(s)?

3. Uncertainty avoidance: Extent of comfort in uncertain situations.
  • High uncertainty: Prefer rules, plans, and routines. Japan, Belgium, Greece.
  • Low uncertainty: Comfortable with ambiguity and unpredictability. Jamaica, Hong Kong

Recommended Adaptations: Provide clear instructions to the high uncertainty members while giving low uncertainty members opportunities to function unaided.

4. Masculinity – Feminists: Concern for self and success versus a focus on caring and sharing.

Masculine: Masculine-oriented members focus on the task and personal success. Assertive, decisive, dominant. Japan, Venezuela, Italy.

Feminine: Feminine-oriented members focus on member relations and respect for others. Nurturing, cooperative. Sweden, Norway, Denmark.

Recommended Adaptations: Give high-context members time to review information and react; demonstrate the value o going beyond “just facts” to low-context members.

5. High context – low context: Directness of communication is specific circumstances.
  • High context: High context members consider background, nonverbal cues, and interpersonal history when communicating. Messages are implied and context-sensitive. Japan, China, Greece, Mexico
  • Low Context: Low-context members want facts a clear, direct, communication. Messages are explicit, factual, and objective. England, the US, and Germany.

Recommended Adaptations:  Give high-context members time to review the information and react; demonstrate the value of going beyond “just facts” too low context-members.

6. Monochronic Polychronic: How people organize and value time.
  • Monochronic: Monochronic members focus on one task at a time and work hard to meet deadlines. Adhere to plans, schedules, and deadlines because time is valuable. North America and Northern European.
  • Polychronic: Polychronic members are frequently late, do many things at once, are easily distracted and tolerant of interruptions. Not obsessed with promptness or schedules because time is not highly valued. Kenya, Argentina, African American.

Recommended Adaptations: Encourage monochromic members to take responsibility for time-sensitive tasks while accepting that polychromic members will vary Punctual based on the nature and importance of a situation or relationship.

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Listening Style: People-Oriented, Content-Oriented, Action-Oriented, and Time-Oriented Listening

Listening Style or PACT Listening: People-oriented listeners, content-oriented listening, action-oriented listening, and time-oriented listening. Four types of Listeners.

The Listener Preference Acronym PACT represents the four types of listening preferences presented. The four types of listening style are People-oriented listeners, content-oriented listening, action-oriented listening, and time-oriented listening.

Four types of Listening Style:

  1. People-oriented listeners
  2. Action-oriented listeners
  3. Content-Oriented Listeners
  4. Time-Oriented Listeners
  1. People-oriented listeners

Listeners demonstrate people-oriented preferences when they show care and concern for others’ feelings, emotional and try to find areas of common interest. Listeners are very Sensitive to others. They try to find areas of interest between themselves and the speaker—telling a personal story to calm down members who may be upset and angry. These kinds of listeners may also become distracted by others’ problems. They may engage in too many side conversations during meetings.

For example, an audience is crying for listening to the pathetic history of Mother Teresa.

Strategies for Communicating with People-Oriented Listeners: Use emotional examples and appeals, Use “we” rather than “I” in conversations.

2. Action-oriented listeners:

Listeners demonstrate action-oriented preferences when they jump ahead to get the point quickly. They give clear feedback concerning expectations. They also encourage others to be organized and concise. Less likely to pay attention to the relational communication dimension of a message

Strategies for Communicating with Action-Oriented Listeners: Keep main points to three or fewer, Speak at a rapid but controlled rate.

3. Content-Oriented Listeners:

Listeners demonstrate content-oriented preferences when they test or evaluate facts and evidence. They pay more attention to technical information rather than general information. Content-Oriented Listeners enjoy receiving complex or challenging information. They are very careful to evaluate information before forming an opinion about the information by asking questions.

For example, an audience just raises his hand and asks the speaker that may we have an example regarding this issue.

Strategies for Communicating with content-oriented Listeners: Use two-side arguments when possible.

4. Time-Oriented Listeners:  

Listeners demonstrate time-oriented preferences when they let others know how much time they have to listen or tell others how long they have to meet.

For Example: Manage and save time, Set time guidelines for meetings and conversations, Discourage wordy speakers, Give cues to others when time is being wasted.

Strategies for Communicating with Time-Oriented Listeners:  Ask how much time the person has to listen

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